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Saturday, May 31, 2014

DIY Easy Minnie Mouse and Mickey Mouse Cake Plates & Free Food Label Printables

So when I bought all the Minnie Mouse stuff on clearance I did not get cake plates. I had pink cake plates we could use and Hazel was willing, however I kept seeing plates with ears on them as I researched for ideas. I realized how easy it would be to make them. I bought a pack of black cake plates at the Dollar Tree. Supplies to make the Mickey Mouse plates is just a pack of plates, black construction paper (two large sheets gave me enough ears for sixteen plates), a 3-inch circle punch and a glue stick.

I decided to use glue stick instead of craft glue so there would not be excess on the plates. To make Minnie Mouse plates you also need pink polka-dot paper (I found a pack of bright polka dot paper at Target--it was the only place I could find any) and scissors. I used the free jpg of bows at The Lovebugs Blog: Lovebug's Bow-tique Birthday Party.  Since I got them as a jpg, I was able to shrink the size for the plates. I am providing the new size of bows, but go check out her site for other great printables!! Here are the bows I used.




To make the plates, just punch two ears for each plate. I folded my large construction paper in half and did both sheets at a time so I got enough for two plates each time. Take two circles and put a little glue on one edge. Then glue to plate in appropriate places. Hold for a few seconds since it takes a bit of pressure to get the glue stick to stick. Let dry and do the next one. These will give you Mickey Mouse cake plates.


Mickey Mouse Cake Plate
(Sorry for the poor quality picture. My camera is acting funny!!) To make Minnie Mouse print out the bows using the template shared above on your bow paper and then put a small amount of glue stick on the back bottom edge of the bow and hold in place on the plate. You could also glue a ribbon bow on, but this would take longer and seeing how they are cake plates that will end up being messy and thrown away, I didn't think it was worth the expense or time.


I think they look cute and Hazel loves them! Since we are talking cake plates, I thought I would share our food labels with you as well. I will explain the food that goes with them in another post. I gave Hazel the choice of two types. I am providing you with both!  Just click picture for each type.


https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B8PVW7zBWFxscUd1UTc4T1JFejQ/edit?usp=sharing
Food Labels Using Characters and Clip Art Found On-Line


https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B8PVW7zBWFxsSHI4NUY0d3d3Yk0/edit?usp=sharing
Mickey & Minnie Mouse Food Labels
To make the Minnie Food Labels, I added bows again. I used the same template, but slightly larger. You can find them here.

So that is our newest installment of our Minnie Mouse Birthday Party series! For more posts check out:



Friday, May 30, 2014

Sharing Saturday 14-22


Sharing Saturday Button

It was another amazing party last week!! If you have not checked out all the great ideas shared, you should!! As always, they are so inspiring. Thank you to everyone who shared with us and to all who visited and commented on others ideas. We did not have a most clicked post. We did however have many posts shared about learning letters, so I am featuring some of those as well as a few of my favorites of the others.


Letter Lessons

1) From The Pleasantest Thing: Learning Letters Game
2) From Munchkin and Bean: Felt Alphabet Bean Bags
3) From Munchkins and Moms: Letterpress Toast
4) From Excite and Explore: Learning Letters: The Letter B
5) From Exploring Literacy with Heart: DIY Alphabet Memory Game
6) From Bible Fun for Kids: Preschool Alphabet: N Is for Naaman


A Few of My Favorites


1) From Growing Book by Book: Car Trip Games: Are We There Yet Maps
2) From Sparkling Buds: Crepe Paper Flowers
3) From Mini Monets and Mommies: Father's Day Wood Print Art Activity
4) From Gift of Curiosity: Shapes Activity: How Many Ways Can You Make a Shape?
5) From Munchkins and Moms: Toddler Bed to Train Table (in Less Than 5 Minutes)


Thank you to everyone who shared last week!! I hope you will join us and share again!! If you are featured here, please feel free to grab a featured button to display proudly on your blog. 

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Featured Button Code:


From Your Hostess:
This week we shared a Round-Up of all our Patriotic Crafts for Memorial Day, a Philippine Cinderella, Croatian Honey Pie for Around the World in 12 Dishes, Asian-Pacific Crafts for the Multicultural Kids Blog Asian-Pacific American Heritage Month Blog Hop, and Asian Kites.





Now for This Week's Party  
A Few Simple Guidelines:
1)  Please follow Crafty Moms Share via GFC (or one of the other ways that work for you).  

2)  Link any kid-friendly, child-centered post. Please no etsy shops or giveaways, etc.  Remember to link to your actual post. 

3) Post the Sharing Saturday button on your sidebar or somewhere on your blog to help spread the word.
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4) I would love it if you would follow me on FacebookGoogle+, and Pinterest 

5) If you do not have a blog, but want to share an idea you can leave it in the comments or e-mail it to me with a picture (if possible).

 
 Disclaimer: By sharing here, you are giving Crafty Moms Share permission to use your photos for features and to pin your craft at Pinterest.

Thursday, May 29, 2014

Asian Kites


Hazel has been asking to fly a kite for awhile. Somehow whenever we are at my parents, it does not happen. They live near a beach and usually have more wind (and less trees and power lines) than us. Plus my father has some kites or at least he thinks he does. Well I bought her a cheap Disney Princesses kite and we are taking it to my parents' house this weekend. She is so excited. I told her by having her making paper kites in Asian styles with me first. I was really excited to find Asian Kites by Wayne Hosking at our local library.

All of the styles of kites we made came from this book. The book explains how to make real kites with Silkspan, however I was not looking to make kites to fly, but kites to show Hazel different styles from the Asian countries. We made them with paper and streamers. In fact we used leftover black streamers from Oriental Trading that we reviewed in our Minnie Mouse Pinata post. We also substituted drinking straws for the balsa wood to strengthen the kites. 

Source: Wikimedia Commons
The book has a bit of the history of the kite in the Introduction. Although many places say the first kite was flown in China, Asian Kites says it is actually unknown. It is believed that kites date back to two and a half to three thousand years ago. Kites also once carried messages based on their shapes, pictures or other cultural symbols. Eventually every day people began to fly them without a religious significance. There are many theories to how a kite came to be including leaves, trying to emulate birds, the wind blowing a farmer's hat and a tent or sail becoming airborne in the wind. Stories of Chinese kite flying spread through Europe thanks to Marco Polo. In the 15th and 16th centuries examples of kites were brought back from China and the East Indies. In the 18th and 19th centuries Europeans and Americans were using kites for scientific studies of natural elements including developing the flying machine. Asians were still flying kites to celebrate nature and human spirit. Many Asian cultures share their past with kite festivals as well as kite tours.

China gets to boast the first written record of a kite flying dating back to 196 B.C.E. The description tells how the Chinese general Han Hsin flew a kite to help calculate the distance his army would have to tunnel to escape. There are many legends of how the Chinese attempted to use kites in battle. The Chinese also used them for cultural and religious significances. With the invention of paper by Tsai Lun, kites became  a universal folk art and possible for all people to enjoy flying. From a Kite Day Festival to scaring away evil spirits at grave sites, the Chinese have a rich history of kite flying. Today China has six main kite regions. Each region uses a unique kite style. October is the traditional month for kite flying, but due to favorable winds kite flying season usually runs from the Chinese New Year through Qingming, the day for mourning the dead on April 5. 

We chose to make the Butterfly kite. The book describes it as a fair to good flier in light to gentle breezes. The Chinese often make and fly Butterfly kites because they represent beauty and a free spirit. There is also an old saying: "Only the greatest artists go to heaven to paint butterfly wings.


Kites have a long history in Malaysia as well. In fact some scholars believe Malaysia may have been the birthplace of kites. In Malaysia kites are called wau. A legend from the state of Kedah say the knowledge of how to build a kite is an effort to appease the heavens. If you visit northern Malaysia any time from April to June you will most likely see colorful kites flying. During this time they have monsoon winds which are strong enough to fly large kites and also it is after the rice harvest and is a time when farmers and fishermen celebrate life.

We chose to make the Mini Wau. The Mini Wau is a child's kite that is often flown from a stick. Since they believe the wau is a gift from the gods, they fly them in hopes of good fortune. This one I made out of tissue paper which the book said could be used instead of lightweight Silkspan.

Kite flying is very popular in Thailand as well. Oral tradition puts kite flying back in the 13th century when Thailand became a country. The earliest recording of kite flying was a ritual priests performed. They were also part of fighting war as well as just a love of the entire country. Kites often were entangled with the roofs of the royal palace. Eventually there was an edict forbidding flying kites over the palace. Based on a challenge of King Rammi II, a traditional kite game is established and is now a national sport held each March in front of the royal palace. 

We chose to make the Thai Fish kite. It is said to be a fair to good flier in gentle to moderate breezes. The fish is a major source of food in Thailand. It is second only to rice and since both are associated with water they are said to belong together. The fish often represents abundance.

Korea may have gotten kites from China during the period of the Three Kingdoms. Kites are called Yeon in Korea. Kites have not changed much in Korea over the centuries. Kite flying is part of many ceremonies and once again there are many stories of how kites were used. The kite flying season closely relates to the agricultural cycle. Koreans begin flying kites on the first day of the lunar calendar and the kite season lasts for fifteen days. There is also an annual custom of kite fighting. Kite fighting involves trying to cut the other kites' strings. They do not attach blades of any kind, but use skill of the flier and the specially prepared string to do this. Once cut, the freed kite belong to whomever can capture it. They have special kites for kite fighting called a bangpae-yeon or shield kite. There are also special kites to fly on the fifteenth day of the lunar calendar to fight off evil. Traditionally the flier of these kites releases the line after all of the line is out. These special kites include the aeg-mag-i-yon and song-aeg-yon. 

We chose to make the Ga-o-ri-yon or ray fish kite. It is fair to good flier in light to gentle breezes. It is a rhombus shape and resembles a sting ray in the sky. It is typical of children's kites all over Asia. 

During the seventh century Japanese civil servants brought the knowledge of kites and paper from China. Kites held a special importance in Japan and only the privileged class and monks could fly them. The monks used them to keep evil spirits away and invoke a rich harvest. The Japanese considered kites a way to carry petitions to the spirit gods. It is also a traditional Japanese belief that a destroyed kite's soul is released  and is free to be reborn in another kite. There are many Japanese folk stories involving kites. There are approximately 340 different traditional kites made in forty-two districts of Japan. Families share their heritage today through kites on special days like New Year's Day and Children's Day. There are also kite battles in May and June.

We decided to make a kao-no-tako or octopus kite. It is a fair to good flier in gentle to moderate breezes. It comes from Sanjo in Niigato (Japan's west coast). Tako means both octopus and kite. During the Edo Period, kite makers often hung these octopus-shaped kites in front of their stores as a sign of their occupation. 

Those are our Asian kites and some of the things we discovered about kites in Asia thanks to Asian Kites. Over the weekend I hope to share what we have learned about Children's Day in Japan as well as our craft of a carp wind sock (often mistaken for a kite). 

We are sharing this at the Multicultural Kids Blog Asian-Pacific American Heritage Month Blog Hop. If you missed our post co-hosting this blog hop, we shared some Asian-Pacific Island crafts and stories we have done and read to learn more about the cultures in that part of the world.

For more Asian-Pacific Island crafts and stories, check out:

Wednesday, May 28, 2014

Asian-Pacific American Heritage Blog Hop: Asian Crafts


Asian-Pacific American Heritage Month Blog Hop - Multicultural Kid Blogs 
In honor of Asian-Pacific American Heritage Month, Multicultural Kid Blogs is sponsoring a blog hop, and you are invited! We are celebrating the cultures and peoples of this diverse region by sharing our posts and asking other bloggers to do the same! Our hope is to create a wonderful resource for celebrating Asian-Pacific American Heritage Month with children. Be sure to visit the co-hosts of the blog hop (listed below) and share your own posts at the linky at the bottom! You can find even more resources on this region in our Asia and Australia and Oceania boards on Pinterest!
Co-Hosts

For the blog hop we decided to share some of the Asian-Pacific Island crafts we have been doing as well as a few books we have enjoyed! We have been having fun exploring games, puzzles, stories and crafts! For our crafts we used three books as our main resources: Asian-American Crafts Kids Can Do! by Sarah Hartman, Hands-On Asia: Art Activities for All Ages by Yvonne Y. Merrill, and Asian Crafts by Judith Hoffman Corwin.

We started by looking at China with a Chinese Tanagram Puzzle. I made one from a square piece of memo paper. I copied the line placement from Asian Crafts.

Then I showed Hazel the pictures of ways to arrange the shapes and she chose some of her favorites and made them. For more ideas on looking at China, check out the posts here.


Next we looked at Japan with some origami. I made some shapes for Hazel and she and I made a few.


To make these origami animals, we followed instructions from two books: Super Quick Origami Animals by Nick Robinson and Making Origami Animals Step by Step by Michael G. La Fosse. One of the things I really liked about making origami and about the tanagram is that you can review geometrical shapes. We talked about folding the paper into rectangles or triangles. For older children you can go into more detail and talk about right triangles, etc. 

We also made Japanese fans. Now Hazel has a thing for fans, so she loved this. We followed instructions using Asian-American Crafts Kids Can Do! except instead of cutting out circles we used paper plates. To make them you need a paper plate or a paper circle and three popsicle/craft sticks. Two of the sticks are glued in a v-shape next to the handle stick to support your circle. For more ideas on looking at Japan, check out here.

We also had fun making a Nepal snow leopard mask. Hazel pointed out how we saw snow leopards at the zoo recently. Again I used a paper plate and cut the pattern we found in Hands-On Asia. Not reading the directions closely I cut out the eyes to make it a wearable mask instead of a piece of art. Then I let Hazel have fun. I cut out the mouth, tongue and ears for her as well as using the book's pattern for the nose.

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B8PVW7zBWFxsZmV3UVNXdGt2bzQ/edit?usp=sharing

I also followed the instructions in Asian Crafts for a simplified version of Pachisi, a game from India. I decided to make it on the computer instead of hand drawing all the squares. As a result, you can download what I made by clicking the picture above or here. We decided to use glass beads and rocks as the playing pieces. Hazel could not wait to play and started to play with Ducky. 

To start you put the piece on its matching color in the corner of the board. The first person rolls the die (you have to make one either by cutting mine out and taping it together or getting a wooden cube and painting/coloring sides). If the person rolls his or her own color they get to move one square counterclockwise and then roll again. If the person rolls white, they just get to roll again. If they roll any other color the turn is over and the die goes to the person to the right. Once the piece makes its way around the board the player than has to go up the center spoke on their color. The person to make it to the middle first wins. For more ideas on learning about India, check out these posts.

Hazel's and Ducky's Game In Play
We have also been enjoying some stories from the different countries and about children adjusting to moving from the country to America and such. Here are some of our favorites. 

For more book choices, check out my Asian-Pacific Book Round-Up post. For all of our Asian-Pacific Island related posts check out here. And of course check out all the great ideas shared in this blog hop!! Feel free to share your Asian-Pacific crafts, books, and more as well!!


Monday, May 26, 2014

Around the World in 12 Dishes: Croatian Honey Pie


Ok, I have to admit I had trouble getting too excited for Around the World in 12 Dishes and I had an even harder time getting Hazel interested. As a result, we are posting a week late. Sorry!! I think the reason is I had a hard time finding books and really anything on Croatia besides things on-line. Our library network literally had six books having to do with Croatia in all the Children's Departments. One of the six was a novel and one was a picture book that never mentioned Croatia and the rest were the non-fiction books about Croatia. We did not read a whole lot about the country this month. However I did write the introduction on the Around the World in 12 Dishes blog.




I think the main problem for getting materials is Croatia became independent again in the 1990's. There just is not much on Croatia out there because of its newness. I did find several sites with Croatian recipes. We decided on a recipe from Honest Cooking called Croatian Honey Pie. One of the sites explained that what we call cake they call pie in Croatia. Since the measurements are given in ounces and grams, we weighed most ingredients. I will give you my estimates however. I also could not find plum jam, so we used homemade strawberry and blueberry jams (we made it on Memorial Day, so we went for the red, white and blue theme).

Croatian Honey Pie (adapted from Honest Cooking)

Ingredients
For the Dough


  • Just under 3 cups of all-purpose flour
  • 2 eggs
  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • 2 tablespoons honey
  • 3 tablespoons almond milk (we try to have things dairy-free for Hazel)
  • just under a cup of sugar
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder (I didn't read the recipe very well and used powder instead of soda)
  • pinch of salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
For the Filling
  • 1 1/4 cups almond milk
  • just under a cup of sugar
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 3 tablespoons cornstarch
  • the rest of the stick of butter and another stick
  • jam
Instructions
  1. Make the filling first, so it can cool. In a saucepan combine one cup of the milk with sugar and vanilla extract. Heat it until it boils. Combine 1/4 cup of milk with the cornstarch. Add this to the boiling milk and cook until it thickens stirring constantly. Cover the surface with plastic wrap and let cool to room temperature.
  2. Prepare dough. Combine one egg, butter, honey, sugar and milk in a saucepan. Heat until all ingredients dissolve.
  3. In a separate bowl, combine flour, salt, cinnamon and baking powder. Add melted mixture to flour mixture and the remaining egg. Knead it until it forms a dough. 
  4. Divide dough into two equal parts. Roll each one out on a lightly floured surface as thin as possible.
  5. Place on a parchment lined baking sheet.
  6. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Bake for 7-10 minutes. Make sure not to over bake. Let cool completely then cut each into equal pieces.
  7. While it is baking, beat softened butter for filling until it is fluffy. Then add to the cooled filling from step 1. Combine well (I beat them both with the mixer to combine). 
  8. To assemble, place a piece of the baked cake/biscuit and cover with half the filling. Put on second layer of cake and spread with jam (we used strawberry). Place third layer of cake. We spread this with blueberry jam and then covered with the rest of the filling. Top with final layer of cake.
  9. Place in refrigerator for a few hours. If you want to dust with powdered sugar and enjoy!
We could not wait to try it, so we did cut into it before the final refrigeration. However this was messy. The refrigerating helps the filling solidify a bit and hold everything together. We did not dust it with powdered sugar. Steve and I both like it a lot, but Hazel doesn't really like it. I was surprised since you taste so much of the jams and cinnamon. However Steve told me he really liked it. So that is our Croatian experience. Have you made a Croatian recipe? Or do you want to learn more about Croatia? Check out all these other great blogs posts or join us in the blog hop! The Croatian placemat is available here and the passport pages are here.


Around the World in 12 Dishes is hosted by 
Adventures In Mommydom, Afterschool for Smarty Pants, All Done Monkey, Crafty Moms Share, Glittering Muffins, Kid World Citizen, Mermaids' Makings, The Mommy Talks and The Usual Mayhem.
Don't forget to check out all the posts that get linked up for more great Croatian dishes and crafts!

Sunday, May 25, 2014

Happy Memorial Day--Patriotic Craft and Food Round-Up

As the United States pauses in its daily life to remember the brave who gave their lives for our country and those who are still fighting, I would like to take time to first thank all of our soldiers and their families who sacrifice so much for our freedom. I will also pause today to say a prayer for all of them and I hope you will join me.

As we are pausing in our daily life, I thought I would give you a round-up of our patriotic crafts and food.

1) Understanding the Pledge of Allegiance
2 & 3) Patriotic Wreaths
4) Changeable Felt Patriotic Wreath
5) Utensil Holders
6) Red, White and Blue Sugar Cookies shaped as Flags, Stars and the USA
7) Red, White and Blue Fruit Salad
8) Red, White and Blue Pancakes
9) Toddler Made Easy Patriotic Placemat
10) Flag Placemat
11) Wind Socks
12) Patriotic Candle Holders
13) Fireworks Crown
14) Rockets
15) States Frame
16) Shell Sailboats

For more ideas check out:
I hope you have a safe and happy Memorial Day!! And please remember what the day is for and that it is not just about the barbeques!!

Saturday, May 24, 2014

Fairy Tales in Different Cultures: Abadeha: the Philippine Cinderella

I am doing our Fairy Tale in Different Cultures a day early. I am hoping to have our dish from Croatia tomorrow. I hope you will come see what we make!

Continuing with our Asian-Pacific theme for May, I thought I would share another Cinderella tale this time from the Philippines. The book is Abadeha: The Philippine Cinderella adapted by Myrna J. de la Paz. Before I share the story and craft, a bit about the Philippines.


http://www.lonelyplanet.com/maps/asia/philippines/
Source: Lonely Planet
The Philippines is a sovereign island country in Southeast Asia. It lies in the western Pacific Ocean. It consists of over 7,000 islands. The total area of the country is about 115,831 square miles making it the 64th largest country in the world. It is a constitutional republic with a presidential system. Filipino and English are the official languages however there are over 171 living languages spoken there. The capital is Manila and the most populous city is Quezon city. It is located on the Pacific Ring of Fire and close to the equator and as a result is prone to earthquakes and typhoons. Its rainforests and coastlines provide diverse ranges of birds, animals and plants. It has one of the highest discovery rates in the world with sixteen new species of mammals discovered in the last ten years. They have many unique species of animals as well as plants like many rare orchids and rafflesia.



In 1521 Ferdinand Magellan arrived and claimed the islands for Spain. The Spanish established Manilla as the capital city in 1571. The Spanish fought many wars with indigenous people as well as other countries for control of the Philippines. The Spanish introduced the idea of free public schooling as well as Christianity. They also brought many different types of food from the Americas like pineapple, corn, chili peppers and tomatoes. In 1898, Spain sold their rights to the United States for 20 million dollars as part of the 1898 Treaty of Paris. In 1935 the Philippines were granted Commonwealth status. During World War II the Japanese Empire invaded and took control until the Allied Forces defeated them in 1945. The Philippines became a founding member of the United Nations and the United States recognized its independence in 1946. 



Now onto our story. The story begins as many Cinderella tales do. A fisherman named Abek, his wife, Abadesa, and their beautiful daughter, Abadeha, live happily  in the islands called the Philippines. When Abadeha is thirteen her mother suddenly gets sick and dies. Abek and Abadeha are filled with sorrow. Eventually Abek marries a widow from another island who has two daughters of her own. He hopes to make a loving family for himself and Abadeha. However the stepmother immediately notice how plain and mean-spirited her daughters are in comparison to Abadeha. Abek is away from the home more since he has a larger family to support and while he is away the stepmother mistreats Abadeha making her work from morning to night cleaning the house, cooking all the meals, fetching the water from the river and tending the stove. She is often covered with soot and each night she is so tired she falls asleep on the kitchen floor. Her stepsisters began to tease her for her dirtiness. The stepmother begins to throw impossible tasks for Abadeha to do like change a black handkerchief to white and a white one to black or she will be whipped. Abadeha goes to the river crying and missing her mother. She cries out a prayer of sorts to her mother and the creator of earth. Suddenly the Spirit of the Forest appears and promises Abadeha that all of her hard work and patience will be rewarded. Then she changes the handkerchiefs for her. When Abadeha returns home, her stepmother is angry that she was able to do it. The next morning she has Abadeha spread newly harvested rice on a mat to dry and then pound the winnow and cook the rice for the evening meal. While Abadeha works in the kitchen a wild pig wanders into the yard and eats the rice while the stepmother watches. The stepmother does nothing until the pig has left and then tortures Abadeha and tells her she must mend the mat that the pig shredded.  Abadeha takes the shreds of mat to the river and says her prayer again. The Spirit of the Forest comes even quicker this time. She has female spirits quickly repair the mat and gives Abadeha a sarimanok. A sarimanok is a chicken with a long flowing tail and feathers the color of the rainbow. The stepmother is annoyed again when she sees Abadeha has completed the task. She takes the sarimanok from her and tells her she will take care of her pet for her. Early the next morning she chops off its head and feet and begins cooking it for dinner. Abadeha sees it and weeps. She grabs its feet and runs to the river. The Spirit tells her to bury the feet by her mother's grave and to pray to her ancestors. She does this and plants a garden around her mother's grave as well. It is awhile before she returns to her mother's grave and when she does she discovers a tree filled with treasures like jewelry and gowns. She grabs a few pieces of jewelry and keeps the enchanted tree to herself. 

While hunting in the forest, the son of the island chieftain saw a sarimanok. He followed it to Abadeha's secret garden. He took a ring from the tree and put it on his finger. When he returned home his finger began to swell and he could not get the ring off. He told his father about his finger and how he was in great pain. His father sent for the Babaylan, the priest healer. The Babylan told him he had to listen to his heart. That night the pain in the prince's finger was so great and he had a dream where a sarimanok brings him an orchid and when the prince kisses the flower it turns into a beautiful maiden who shows him the ring in her hand. He tells his father of the dream and his father announces that the girl who can remove the ring from his son's finger will marry his son. When Abadeha heard this announcement she asked her stepmother to go and her stepmother locked her in the kitchen and then went to take a nap. The Spirit of the Forest came and unlocked the door for her. When she arrived her stepsisters were there. They began to yell at her for being there. The prince heard the commotion and asked Abadeha to come to him. She lovingly was able to take the ring off his finger even if she was dressed in rags. The prince was overjoyed and married her. Abadeha wore the golden gown and the jewelry from the enchanted tree. Her father came home just in time for the wedding. The prince banished the stepmother and her daughters to the chicken yard. Abadeha and the prince shared their happiness and wealth with the people on the islands and lived in peace and love and harmony. 

In the author's note it is mentioned that this story is a traditional Philippine folktale that has disappeared from mainstream Philippine folk literature. With more than 300 years of Spanish colonization and a century of Americanization this is a common casualty there. She wanted to record the story before it was lost forever.



As a craft I made a paper plate sarimanok. I did it similar to the sea gulls Hazel and I made at the library a few weeks ago. I added the red comb and the tail of rainbow feathers. It is very easy.

For other Asian-Pacific Island Cinderella tales check out: